Nutcracker

19 March Monday - 19:00
 

Ballet, two acts
P.I.Chaikovsky

Libretto by M.Petipa as adapted by Andrei Petrov based on Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann’s fairy tale.
Choreographer-director is Andrei Petrov, people’s artist of the Russian Federation, Moscow Award laureate
Scene designer is Anatoly Nezhny, merited art worker of the Russian Federation
Costume designer is Olga Polyanskaya

The “Nutcracker” continues the line of the Kremlin Ballet Theatre in preserving and carefully creatively reframing the classical ballet heritage. In this case choreographer Andrei Petrov managed to the most to come close to the literary primary source and recreate a fantastic world and philosophy of the great German storyteller Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann.
Andrei Petrov’s “Nutcracker” is not a child’s fairy tale interesting for kids only, but a story of the first love rise and the opening of a huge world of non-childish emotions and feelings. The ballet’s choreography delivers the whole range of new senses of a just grown-up girl who, together with her beloved young Drosselmeyer, confronted the evil and conquered it having defended her love.

The performance is accompanied by the Symphony Orchestra Radio Orpheus (Artistic managing director and Principal conductor - Sergey Kondrashov)

Act One
Quests are gathering for a Christmas eve party at the Stahlbaum home. Among them – the young Drosselmeiere, a close friend of the family. The children are eagerly awaiting the moment when they will be allowed to open the Christmas presents. The Christmas tree is ablaze with candles, the guests start to dance. Drosselmeiere has only to leave the guests for a moment, for the children beg him to show them conjuring tricks and their presents. The clockwork dolls delight them. Drosselmeiere is much taken by Marie’s beauty. He gives her a new toy – a funny, rather clumsy Nutcracker doll. Fritz, Marie’s brother, frightens his sister with a clockwork mouse, and then he breaks the Nutcracker doll. The party draws to a close. After one final dance, the guests depart and the children are sent off to bed.
Night-time. The room is lit up by the mysterious light of the moon. Marie rocks her broken doll and falls asleep with the Nutcracker beside her. She dreams the dolls have come alive and the whole world has been transformed: everything round her looks different and the Christmas tree grows bigger and bigger. All of a sudden, a horde of mice appear, led by the Mouse King. The dolls and toy soldiers are taken aback. The brave Nutcracker and his army of dolls, enter into battle with the Mouse King and his suite. The odds are uneven however, and the mice are getting the better of them.
At a key moment of the fighting, Marie fires a cannon. The mice scuttle away: silence descends on the battlefield. But the brave Nutcracker has been killed. Marie is inconsolable. Then a miracle comes to pass: the funny doll turns into a handsome Prince, who resembles the young Drosselmeiere, and who whisks Marie off into a magical fairytale world.
The room becomes a forest in winter-time. A snow-storm gets up, eddies of snow come spinning down, forming into drifts of sparkling snowflakes.
Act Two
Marie and the Nutcracker-Prince journey through the fairytale kingdom. They are pursued by the Mouse King and his horde of mice. The Prince does battle with them and vic¬torious. A celebration in honor of the victor gets underway in the fairytale kingdom whose inhabitants welcome the two friends. Marie and the Nutcracker-Prince are overjoyed, they know the love each other. And, from all corners of the earth, dolls who have come alive tell them the tale of their love. The Christmas Eve night, the last night of Marie’s childhood, is coming to an end. On waking up in her room, Marie cannot find her doll. Instead of the funny Nutcracker, she sees be¬fore her the young Drosselmeiere, the object of her fairytale Christmas Eve dreams, the person she loves. She has fallen in love for the first time!